Bone Language Forthcoming from YesYes Books in April 2023 ”

Jamaica (she/her) hails from Santa Cruz, CA by way of Seattle. Her first book, Bone Language, will be published by YesYes Books in 2023. Her work has appeared, or is forthcoming, Prairie Schooner, World Literature Today, The Adroit Journal and The Missouri Review, among others. She is a 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, winner of the 2021 RHINO Poetry editor's prize, and winner of the 2019 San Miguel de Allende Writers Conference Contest in Poetry. Her writing has been supported by Hedgebrook, Furious Flower, and the Jack Straw Writers program. Jamaica is currently pursuing her PhD in English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln with a focus on poetry and Women's and Gender Studies.

 

POETRY

FORTHCOMING 

"Like a soft horn," Poetry Northwest - online

"Film script: on an open road (an anti drama)" and "Portrait of a mother with hawk and house," Poetry northwest - Print

"Neglectus," Hunger mountain

"A Woman with Terminal cancer talks about death" and "What's Been Caged," DIAGRAM

 

Select poems

"The End of sorrow is not happiness," Indiana Review

Country" and "Nation," Southeast Review

"A Language So Fraught," ROOM Magazine

"As the nurse fills out the intake form, the ocean speaks your name," Ruminate, Summer 2021

"Father weaver," Rhino, Summer 2021

"Breast/less," rhino, Summer 2021

"Naturally," The Massachusetts Review, Spring 2021 

"Forbidden," The Missouri review, Fall 2020

"Inheritance," The missouri review, Fall 2020

Girl Walks to the Beach," The Missouri review, Fall 2020

"Once at an Art Party in Chelsea," The Missouri Review, Fall 2020

"Unravel," Glass Journal, Special elections feature, Nov. 3 2020

"Windfall," World Literature Today, Sept. 2020

"Home," Guernica, July 2020

“Back in the Day,” The Adroit Journal, Spring 2020 

“What Remains,” December Magazine, Spring 2020

“Haibun for My Brother,” December Magazine, Spring 2020 

“A Brief and Sordid History of the Speculum,” The inspired poet by Susan Landgraf, 2020

“Cell Revolt,” The Inspired Poet by Susan Landgraf, 2020  

“Portrait of a Woman with Wings in Oil,” TriQuarterly, Issue 156, Summer/Fall 2019 

“Teaching the Beasts to Devour My Mother,” San Miguel de Allende Writer’s Contest Winner, 2019

“1981,” Birdfeast #14, 2018. 

“Stitched,” Prairie Schooner, Summer vol. 92, 2018

Symphonies,” Prairie Schooner, Summer Vol. 92, 2018 

“Contortionist,” City Arts Magazine – Seattle, Feb. 27, 2018 

“All That Splendor," Third Coast Magazine, Issue 44, Winter 2018

 “L and I,” Third Coast Magazine, Issue 44, Winter 2018 

“Far from Grace,” Hayden’s Ferry Review, Issue 61, Fall/Winter 2017. 

“Hunger,” Spiral Orb Thirteen, 2017 

“re-Branding,” Limited Edition Broadside, Chatwin Books, 2017

"Jack Straw Anthology" Enough Mountain,” “Year in Review,” & “Survival Tactics,” 2017 

“Father/less,” Seattle Review of Books, March 7th 2017 

“Vigilant,” Seattle Review of Books, March 14th 2017 

“Discarded,” Seattle Review of Books, March 21st 2017 

“Land Mine,” Seattle Review of Books, March 28th 2017 

“Call Me By My Name,”  Rattle - Poets Respond, February 2nd 2017 

EDITOR CREDITS 

Co-Editor, “Opting Out: Early, New and Collected Poems (2000-2015)”, by Maged Zaher. Chatwin Books Seattle, WA. 

Co-Editor, “Open Late: New and Collected Poems (1979-2018)”, by Rex Wilder. Chatwin Books, Seattle, WA.

EVENTS

Previous events

NBF Presents: Cross-Cultural Connections

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Event Link

National Book Award–honored authors Grace M. Cho (Tastes Like War, 2021 Nonfiction Finalist) and Erika L. Sánchez (I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, 2017 Young People’s Literature Finalist) consider immigrant families, and the intersections of class, food, and mental health across diasporas. Moderated by Jamaica Baldwin, author of Bone Language (forthcoming). Presented in partnership with Metropolitan Community College.

AWP 2022 Event | Breaking the Silence: Ways for Writing To Speak In Workshop

 — (EDT, UTC-04) — (EDT, UTC-04)

Zoom Link Coming Soon

The writer’s silence may be the writing workshop’s longest tradition. And yet, a chorus of recent scholarship problematizes this restriction, and teaches us the value of bringing the writer’s voice into the room. This discussion begins, then, not with the writer’s silence but with their speech. How will writers speak in our workshops? Participants will have opportunities to voice their ideas, ask questions, and respond to strategies suggested by the presenters.

The workshop’s “gag rule” (Kearns) has been widely critiqued, most predominantly by writers of color and others who are marginalized in our primarily white, male, cis, abled workshop environments. Thus, this discussion is urgent, anti-racist, decolonial work. Building on scholarship which has focused on the harm done by silencing the writer, with this event, we aim to move the conversation forward, and foster collaborative change in our workshop practices.

The moderator will begin by welcoming everyone to the discussion, and briefly framing the conversation with some recent scholarship on the topic. Presenters will each pose a question or strategy for discussion, and participants will have time to respond verbally and/or in writing. The moderator will take public notes throughout the event, so that participants leave with a collective list of ideas to draw on in their own teaching as they find ways for writers to speak in workshop.

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NEWS

2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship

DATE: February 4, 2021  

CONTACT: Jamaica Baldwin 

Jamaica Baldwin Receives National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship 

Lincoln, Nebraska—Today, the National Endowment for the Arts announced that Jamaica Baldwin is one of 35 writers who will receive an FY…